Page 8 - ww_v11i3

Basic HTML Version

How? How Often?
“If you use dumbbells, make sure they’re heavy
enough,” Sherry advises. “You shouldn’t be able to
do more than 10 repetitions. Once three sets of 10
becomes easy, increase speed. Curl as many times as
you can in 20 seconds. Or stand on one leg and pick
that dumbbell up from the floor and curl it. Continue
challenging your system.”
Beyond dumbbells, there are many
ways to incorporate strength
training. “Many women can’t
do more than three pushups,”
observes Sherry. “For those
women, a pushup is pure strength
training. Work to do one set of
eight pushups. Or try kettlebells,
the TRX® Suspension Trainer or
Vinyasa Flow Yoga classes – all are
considered strength training.”
Perhaps the best news of all, for
women, strength training doesn’t
require a large time commitment. “Once a week is
enough to exact a change,” Sherry says. “Put strength
training into your workout regimen two or three
times a week for a period of time, then once a
week to maintain.”
Wise Fitness
8
For women, strength training isn’t as much about building
muscle as it is about building a body that will keep you
strong, supple and healthy for the rest of your life.
Sherry McLaughlin, physical therapist and president of
Michigan Institute for Human Performance Inc. (MIHP), has a
favorite saying:
“I’ll take a small smart muscle over
a big dumb one any day.”
“The myth about strength training is that you have to go to
the gym, lift barbells and develop huge muscles,” she says.
The truth: For women, strength training isn’t as much about
building muscle as it is about building a body that will keep
you strong, supple and healthy for the rest of your life.
Why Strength Training Matters
l
Your bones.
“After about age 35, we begin losing
bone density until the day we die,” Sherry explains.
Strength training places stress on your bones, which
in turn increases bone density and reduces your risk of
bone thinning, or osteoporosis.
l
Your weight.
“Strength training increases your
metabolism,” Sherry points out. “More muscle mass
burns more calories even when you’re at rest.”
l
Your comfort.
“Your muscles
are your first line of defense.
Things such as stress fractures
and tendonitis happen because
the muscles aren’t strong
enough to dissipate force coming
through your body. If your muscles
aren’t doing their jobs, the bones take
the stress.”
l
Your health.
Strength training can
alleviate symptoms of many chronic
conditions, including arthritis,
back pain, depression,
diabetes, fatigue and
obesity.
Wise Women Stay Strong
Sherry
McLaughlin,
M.S.P.T. and
HAP-affiliated
physical
therapist