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Before you give yourself an insulin shot, you probably make sure you have the right kind and the correct dose. You also may need to make sure you rotate your injection site.

Changing where you deliver the shot helps keep your skin healthy. It also helps control your blood sugar levels. If you give yourself a shot in the same place every time, hard lumps or fatty deposits could develop. This may afect how the insulin works.

Ask your doctor about a safe plan for rotating

your injection sites. Your plan will be based on your insulin routine, body type and personal preferences. Follow your rotation schedule closely and remember:

●● You can use diferent sites for diferent kinds of insulin. For example, you might use your abdomen for fast-acting insulin and your thighs for long-acting insulin.

●● Try to keep injection sites in the same area of your body but about one inch apart.

Tips for Safe Insulin Use: Changing Your Shot Spot

It’s Flu Shot Season Again: What’s New

When you have diabetes, there’s a bigger chance that the fu could cause other serious problems. For example, it might lead to pneumonia.

This year, the fu shot protects against 2009 H1N1 and seasonal fu. To lower your risk for fu-related health problems, take these three easy steps:

1. Reduce the spread of germs. Wash your hands often with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

2. Minimize contact with people who are sick.

3. Seek medical care, if needed. If you do catch the fu, antiviral medications might help. These medications work best within two days of getting sick.

Talk with your doctor about whether you are at high risk and should receive a pneumococcal vaccine before age 65. Health experts

recommend it for everyone starting at age 65; a booster may be needed after fve years.

When Was Your Last Eye Exam?

Nearly 50 percent of people with diabetes have some form of diabetic retinopathy. This eye disease is a leading cause of blindness. Luckily, many cases involving blindness can be prevented.

To protect your vision, visit an eye care specialist regularly for a dilated eye exam. Dilating widens the pupil, the black circle in the middle of the eye. It makes it easier to fnd problems inside the eye in their early stages. When diabetic retinopathy is caught early, steps like controlling your blood sugar can slow down how fast the disease advances.

How often do you need your eyes checked? Find out in “Essential Eye Care for Diabetes” on My Health Zone. Log in at hap.org and link to Healthy Living. Under Tools and Resources click on My Health Zone. Then search for “diabetes and eye care.”

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