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LiveWell: Nutrition
11
MUFAs and PUFAs — we’re talkin’ about fat, but what’s
it all mean?
A high-fat diet puts you at greater risk of obesity, heart disease and certain
types of cancer, so test your knowledge to see how well you know your fats.
1.
Men and women should eat the same amount of fat. T F
2.
There are diferent types of fat.
T F
3.
Some olive oils are better for you than others.
T F
4.
Canola oil is better for you than most other oils.
T F
5.
Heart-healthy eating means no meat.
T F
Answers:
1.
False.
Limit your total fat intake to less than 25 to 35 percent of your daily
calories. That means 40 to 60 grams of total fat daily for women and 50
to 70 grams of total fat per day for men.
2.
True.
Understand the three types — saturated, monounsaturated
(MUFAs) and polyunsaturated (PUFAs). Saturated fats usually are solid
at room temperature and occur naturally in meat and dairy products,
especially whole milk, cream, cheese and butter, plus coconut and palm
oils. Diets high in saturated fat increase heart disease risk by raising bad
LDL cholesterol.
Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats actually can lower harmful
LDL cholesterol. Olive, peanut and canola oils, and most nuts are high in
monounsaturated fat. You’ll fnd polyunsaturated fat in many nuts and
seeds and vegetable oils like corn, safower and soybean.
3.
False.
Nutritionally, all types of olive oil have the same amount of
calories and fat grams and provide heart-healthy monounsaturated fats.
Only the cost and taste difer.
4.
True.
Canola oil is safe and healthful. It has less artery-clogging saturated
fat than any other oil and contains more heart-healthy monounsaturated
fat than any oil, except olive oil.
5.
Not necessarily true.
Today you can fnd cuts of beef, pork, lamb and
veal that are leaner than ever. Meat provides an excellent source of iron,
zinc and vitamin B12. Just be sure to choose lean cuts, eat small portions
and trim all visible fat before cooking. A healthy serving of meat is about
three ounces cooked or the size of a deck of cards.
The Skinny on Fats
Remember these two tips:
Choose monounsaturated
and polyunsaturated over
saturated fat, but use all fats
in moderation.